The Relaxation Response

December 2, 2018 Joe Brady

One of the most useful skills in the world today is to know how to simply relax. To be able to take a little vacation from the stresses of daily life is one of the best ways to keep yourself healthy. Watch the video as Harvard professor Herbert Benson teaches you how to reach the relaxation response for yourself. The opposite of the fight or flight response is the relaxation response. Physiologically the fight or flight response gears up the mind and body for a fight. We release adrenaline, cortisol, and ACTH all hormones that are useful in a fight but harmful to our health over the long run.
For example, young brown haired rats quickly have their hair turn grey, their skin wrinkle and their bones become osteoporotic shortly after being injected with these stress hormones. Professor, Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School pioneered research into the relaxation response. After the stress is over our bodies have to relax and focus on healing any injuries created after the fight or the flight. Blood pressure comes down, respiration slows and the immune system has been shown to work best when we are relaxed. Professor Bensen has studied the effects of meditation and health since the 1960’s yet gives credit for all these practices to their ancient roots. Benson writes in his book, “We claim no innovation but simply a scientific validation of age-old wisdom”.

Professor Bensen Teaches Relaxation

Watch the Video

This video is part of the Wellness Guide for Cancer Survivors, a new publication from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. It is for adults who have been diagnosed and treated for any type of cancer. It includes information on how cancer survivors can improve their wellness and quality of life in six areas of wellness: physical, emotional, social, spiritual, thinking (cognitive) and work.

This video is part of the Wellness Guide for Cancer Survivors, a new publication from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. It is for adults who have been diagnosed and treated for any type of cancer. It includes information on how cancer survivors can improve their wellness and quality of life in six areas of wellness: physical, emotional, social, spiritual, thinking (cognitive) and work.

 

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